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AWS in Plain English

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kryptothesuperdog
3 days ago
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London, UK
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3D Printed Cartridge Turns Any 35mm Film Camera into a Digital Camera

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YouTuber befinitiv has published a video where he shows how he updated an old Cosina Hi-Lite film camera with a cartridge based on a Raspberry Pi that turned the analog camera into one capable of capturing digital photos and videos.

Befinitiv’s video shows any curious minds how to build a custom film cartridge that turns any analog camera into a digital camera. With it, a photographer is able to drag any analog 35mm camera into the modern-day.

“It can do everything you would expect from a digital camera nowadays,” he says. “It can do video, it can stream video over WiFi, and can store things on an SD card.”

As noted by Hackaday, the design swaps the film canister that would normally be used with a Rasperry Pi Zero that is attached to a 3D-printed case which mimics the shape of the film canister and also houses and affixes the Pi camera in the location where the film would normally be exposed to light — behind the camera’s shutter.

He removed the Pi camera’s lens to instead use his Cosina camera’s own optics and shows how he is able to take digital photos with the film camera that are of surprisingly decent quality.

“[The Pi camera] behaves like the film did,” he explains

The custom cartridge is powered by a small battery and converter that are housed in the 3D-printed film cartridge section. The whole unit fits nicely into the camera and allows the rear plate to cleanly close over it.

In addition to turning the film camera into one that can capture digital photos, as noted it is also capable of video features. Video can be broadcast to a phone or computer over WiFi via the Raspberry Pi.

In his video, befinitiv shows that this particular implementation has, as he says, “quite insane zoom” because of the Pi Camera’s tiny sensor, which makes it hard to see what he is looking at. That said, he has full access to focusing that allows him to get sharp images, despite the zoom.

“I couldn’t really tell from this that it was shot on a 50-year-old camera,” he says when analyzing the video feed. “It looks pretty much like a digital camera to me.”

That’s likely because it is, and the optics on the old film camera are perfectly suitable for the small sensor on the Pi Camera.

“I am really happy how this turned out,” he concludes. “It actually gives some interesting and nice-looking images. And it feels so weird having this old-school camera doing live streams here over WiFi and recording video. It’s really an odd feeling, but a really fun one. I can only recommend to also build something for your cameras because it is really fun and gives these things a new life, which is I think always great for great, high quality, retro-tech items.”

For more from befinitiv, subscribe to his YouTube Channel.

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kryptothesuperdog
12 days ago
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London, UK
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The privacy war inside the W3C

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browser vendors and ad-tech engineers face off in a bitter geeky battle over new privacy standards #
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kryptothesuperdog
14 days ago
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London, UK
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The World’s Greatest Card Trick Can’t Be Taught

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World-renowned magician David Berglas, now 94 years old, does a card trick that’s so effortlessly simple and dazzling that no one has figured it out and Berglas himself says it cannot be taught.

The trick is a version of a classic plot of magic, called Any Card at Any Number. These tricks are called ACAAN in the business.

ACAAN has been around since the 1700s, and every iteration unfolds in roughly the same way: A spectator is asked to name any card in a deck — let’s say the nine of clubs. Another is asked to name any number between one and 52 — let’s say 31.

The cards are dealt face up, one by one. The 31st card revealed is, of course, the nine of clubs. Cue the gasps.

There are hundreds of ACAAN variations, and you’d be hard pressed to find a professional card magician without at least one in his or her repertoire. (A Buddha-like maestro in Spain, Dani DaOrtiz, knows about 60.) There are ACAANs in which the card-choosing spectator writes down the named card in secrecy; ACAANs in which the spectator shuffles the deck; ACAANs in which every other card turns out to be blank.

For all their differences, every ACAAN has one feature in common: At some point, the magician touches the cards. The touch might be imperceptible, it might appear entirely innocent. But the cards are always touched.

With one exception: David Berglas’s ACAAN. He would place the cards on a table and he didn’t handle them again until after the revelation and during the applause. There was no sleight of hand, no hint of shenanigans. It was both effortless and boggling.

Of course, his unwillingness to reveal how the trick works or even that he is unable to show someone else how to do it could be part of the trick. But in recent years, Berglas has pulled back the curtain on most of his other tricks, like the time he made a grand piano vanish into thin air, explained by Berglas himself in a YouTube video:

But not this card trick, as the author of the Times’ piece discovers. A delightful read.

Update: Part of the reason I love publishing posts like this (about magic and unknowable tricks) is that I know I’m gonna get some great feedback. In 2011, Richard Kaufman wrote a book called The Berglas Effects with the participation of Berglas himself in which his version of ACAAN is explained at length. Here’s Kaufman himself remarking on the Times story:

The writer is under the odd impression that “The Berglas Effect” has never been explained and is not explained in my book. There are 75 pages devoted to it.

So…huh. I wonder what the book says about the trick? (thx, bill)

Tags: David Berglas   how to   magic   Richard Kaufman   video
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kryptothesuperdog
60 days ago
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London, UK
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Ted Lasso Believes in You

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Catherynne M. Valente has written an absolutely fantastic review of Ted Lasso that gets to the heart of why so many people love the show so much. I will quote from it at length:

Ted Lasso is like if Mr. Rogers, Bob Ross, Coach Taylor, Leslie Knope, and David Tennant’s Doctor all got together and had a big strange baby. It is a completely formulaic premise that turns around and refuses to follow the formula. It’s wholesome without being boring, kind without being trite, smart without being pedantic, so loving it’ll take your breath away, and gut-bustingly funny. Scripts so tight and hilarious that even one guy just saying his name and the paper he works for is not only a meme but makes you smile each and every time.

Do you know how fucking hard that is to pull off?

It is so much easier to be funny while being cynical. Everyone knows life sucks, it’s easy to get them onside by accessing that universal experience. To sneer and punch down and stand back from the world wrapped up in a sense of coolness that comes at the expense of everyone else and call that edgy. It is so much harder to stay funny while you’re being kind. In a show for adults. For cynical adults who are having a thoroughly rubbish time of it — and that was everyone in 2020. It’s nearly impossible, honestly. Even Parks and Rec constantly shit down Jerry’s neck. The Good Place was full of demons to balance out the philosophy with that kind of humor.

Ted Lasso is just a guy. It’s not the afterlife, it’s not in space, it’s not in a medieval morality play, it’s not even something as high-concept as the fantasy life of JD in Scrubs. He’s just a guy, who has problems, not insignificant ones, but also maybe the secret of life, moving through a traditional comedy plot — in fact, the actual plot of Major League — and handling it like comedy characters never do because it’s easier to do a madcap plot when everyone is being stupid and not communicating and running on the rails of their particular archetypal tropes.

How they managed to make radical empathy funny is just miraculous. And also:

I actually think Ted’s progressive jokes are rather desperately important, as far as TV is ever desperately important. There’s this crushing, dominant idea that real comedy, edgy comedy, modern, cutting-edge comedy is by nature regressive, offensive, in your face, dirty, snickering about women and minorities and LGBTQ folk because if those pious SJWs don’t like it, it must be hysterical. So to speak. That if you’re not offending people, you’re not doing it right. And the intersection of comedy and sports is where this attitude is likely to be EXTREMELY firmly rooted and taken for granted.

But here it’s just…gone. There are zero jokes made at the expense of…really anyone except Jamie and Roy, who both need to experience not being bowed down to in order to become who they need to be. Ted doesn’t even think before deftly acknowledging that Rebecca is funny, but on the off chance she actually has a trans parent, he’s excited and interested to discuss her experience with her without judgment. And yet nothing is lost in terms of fun or laughs, because in every scene, Ted lets everyone be in on the joke with him instead of being a target.

Art can be like this. Art can be like this and nothing is lost. There’s still plenty of edge to go around.

If I were you, I would read the whole thing, especially if you liked this previous post: Ted Lasso, a Model for the Nurturing Modern Man.

Tags: Catherynne M. Valente   Ted Lasso   TV
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kryptothesuperdog
91 days ago
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London, UK
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Anywhere Can Happen

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Sure, there’s the big budget superhero & action films, but the falling cost and increasing availability of really good motion graphics tools also enables a sort of everyday surrealism that’s on display in this short video by Fernando Livschitz. (via colossal)

Tags: Fernando Livschitz   video
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kryptothesuperdog
111 days ago
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cjheinz
111 days ago
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Nice!
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